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20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with more talk of avoiding the much-discussed fiscal cliff. but as november wound down, the president suggested an agreement on taxes and spending could come in time for the holidays. >> i believe that both parties can agree on a frame work that does that in the coming weeks. in fact my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> you know me, i was born with the glass half full. i'm an optimist. >> brown: hopeful signs emanated from the white house and the capitol today, about getting a deal before the new year brings automatic tax hikes and spending cuts. president obama offered his optimism at an event with middle-class americans who'd be hit by any tax increase. >> i'm glad to see-- if you've been reading the papers lately-- - that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. >> brown: one such lawmaker is republican house member tom cole of oklahoma. t
, and businesses tend to be more worried about things like the fiscal cliff, they're more worried about the troubles in europe, they're more worried about the slowdown in china. you do have the disconnect. the big concern is which way is it going to go? who is going to win this tug-of-war? so far it's the consumer but let's hope it's not the other direction because as i said, let's hope that the businesses will eventually come around to thinking about things the way consumers are. . >> brown: nancy cohen, i want to come back to you on the question of online shopping and the changed landscape. does the rise of online shopping have a real impact on the economy or is it sort of shifting, transferring, where people buy their things? >> well, that's a very open question, partly because this is so new. the marriage and the magic of online plus brickes and mortar. i mean, there's no question people are visiting online web sites more often than they do stores. whether that adds up to incremental organic growth is a question we just don't know. remember, we're starting with all online sales from
two opposing views on how to avert the so-called fiscal cliff from representatives tom price and keith ellison. >> brown: then, president obama sat down with mexico's president-elect, enrique pena nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoi
-up demand. can we tell yet? >> one thing i'm worried about is the fiscal cliff issue, the tax increases and spending cuts that take place january 1 unless congress and the president reach a deal. businesses have been worried about that for months. maybe consumers are start-- maybe it's starting to creep into their thinking as well. we saw a weaker consumer sentiment number last week. that's thing to watch to worry about as we wonder what the holiday season will be like. >> brown: nariman behravesh, is it strange or do things really change? on the one hand, we want people to get out and spend, but on the other hand, we still talk about over-spending and spending money people didn't really have was part of the problem that got us into this state in the first place. so what's-- that sounds like a little bit of a disconnect. where are we on that? >> well, i think neil is right in saying consumer finances are in much better shape right now. so in that sense, the kind of spending we're seeing now is more sustainable. it's healthier in a sense. debt levels are down. people are not taking, say,
weathered those attacks and the came out on top. so when they come to a fiscal cliff negotiation, they're saying why should we compromise when you attacked us on the paul ryan budget and we're still standing? voters voted for us. so i think it's less likely we're going to see kind of a grand compromise because both sides are very entrenched. >> woodruff: even with that small pick-up of democrats in the house and even though the presidential vote was bigger than the overall house republican vote? >> right. i mean that's... both camps, you know,. >> woodruff: we'll have an argument. >> i think when it comes to the .. tre's all sorts of discussion on the fiscal cliff. president obama and speaker boehner are probably more willing to compromise, but their caucuses and their parties are very entrenched. i don't think we know what's going to happen out of this. >> woodruff: we certainly don't. nathan gonzales of the rothenberg political report, thank you for coming back to talk to us. >> thank you so much. >> brown: now that new york and new jersey have been hit by two destructive storms in l
when it comes to the .. there's all sorts of discussion on the fiscal cliff. president obama and speaker boehner are probably more willing to compromise, but their caucuses and their parties are very entrenched. i don't think we know what's going to happen out of this. >> woodruff: we certainly don't. nathan gonzales of the rothenberg political report, thank you for coming back to talk to us. >> thank you so much. >> brown: now that new york and new jersey have been hit by two destructive storms in less than two years, there's new urgency to questions about steps to better protect the region. hari sreenivasan is back with that story, part of our series on "coping with climate change." how are we doing in here? sreenivasan: ronnie forester has been working every day to put his statten island house back together again before christmas. forester's home was elevated but it wasn't high enough to save it from sandy. >> well, my house is six feet off the ground. we have four feet of water on our living floor. so you figure at least ten feet of water from where we stand now. imagine
are all looking slightly better than they did a few months ago. but all this talk about the fiscal cliff, the automatic tax riders and spending cuts are unnerving people a little bit. and also we don't know how much people have been biging into their savings earlier in the year. so in spite of positive economic news, people are still going to be cautious and that's going to mean a little bit of growth but not a huge amount. >> sreenivasan: barney jopson of the financial times, thanks for your time. >> thank you. >> sreenivasan: thanksgiving is a time to remember native american life and culture. and that was the life's work of edward curtis, a turn of the century photographer. his story is told in a new biography, "short nights of the shadow catcher" by journalist and author timothy egan, a previous winner of both the pulitzer prize and national book award. jeffrey brown has our book conversation. >> brown: in 1896 edward curtis took this photograph of a woman known as "princess angeline," the last surviving child of the native-american chief for whom the city of seattle was named. it wa
and prepare for success. i do think i can offer those insights. >> woodruff: when you talk about the fiscal cliff are the deadline is supposed to be january 1, but you've been out there talking about what can be done about that. among other things, you're saying taxes should go-- in other words, the bush tax cuts should be allowed to expire on everyone under $500,000. which is more than what the president is saying. he's saying it ought to be at 250. yet difference? and have you tukd him about that? >> sure, yeah, yeah, it was over 500, not under 500. yeah, i-- that position, judy, is one that i put on the table a year ago. and i'll tell you why. there isn't anything sort of theological about the $500,000 number. it's just a compromise. the democrats' position has been tax cuts to expire over 250. the republicans' position has been make all the tax cuts permanent. so a year ago i put a of a compromise on the table. if that compromise were accepted, it would raise $500 billion in revenue over the next 10 years, which would take the potential trillion-dollar sequester and cut it in half. and
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)